Category Archive News

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Make May Purple for Stoke Awareness Month

Stroke Awareness Month, run by the National Stroke Association, is all about wearing purple to raise awareness of strokes and the impact they have.

A stroke is an attack on the brain which happens when blood supply to part of the brain is cut off, causing death of that part of the brain. The effects of a stroke vary depending on which part of the brain is affected and how severe the stroke is.

If you suspect you or someone else is having a stroke, phone 999 immediately and ask for an ambulance.

Recognising the signs of a stroke

The signs and symptoms of a stroke vary from person to person but usually begin suddenly.

The main stroke symptoms can be remembered with the word FAST:

Face – the face may have dropped on one side, the person may not be able to smile, or their mouth or eye may have drooped.

Arms – the person may not be able to lift both arms and keep them there because of weakened or numbness in one arm.

Speech – their speech may be slurred or garbled, or the person may not be able to talk at all despite appearing to be awake; they may also have problems understanding what you’re saying to them.

Time – its time to dial 999 immediately if you notice any of these signs or symptoms.

It’s important for everyone to be aware of these signs and symptoms, particularly if you live with or care for a person who is in a high-risk group, such as someone who is elderly or has diabetes or high blood pressure.

More information can be found at

nhs.uk

Stroke Association

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Covid-19 Vaccination Programme

UPDATE 29th April

NHS COVID-19 vaccination programme update

Our GP-led local vaccination service is providing vaccinations to people in cohorts 1-9 and this will continue.

We will not be providing a vaccination service for people aged 18 to 49 when they become eligible. If you are in this cohort, you will be able to get your vaccination at other local vaccination services including hospital hubs, community pharmacies and larger vaccination centres.

What this means for you?

Cohorts 1-9

Includes those aged 50 and over, health and care workers, unpaid carers and those with a health condition that puts them at greater risk.

We are continuing to book in people in over 50 who have not yet been vaccinated for their first dose and we will carry on doing this to make sure that no-one is left behind.

If you are over 50 and haven’t had your first dose yet, please contact the practice now to make your appointment.

We will be able to give the second dose to everyone who has had their first dose of the vaccine with us. We will invite you for your second dose when this is due.

Cohorts 10-12

People aged 18 to 49

Vaccinations have been delivered according to priority groups identified by the Joint Committee of Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI).

If you are aged 18 to 49, you will be contacted by the NHS when it is your turn and you will be able to choose from a range of local vaccination services including community pharmacies, hospital hubs and vaccination centres.

When your age group becomes eligible, you will be able to book your vaccine and choose a local service through the national booking service at www.nhs.uk/covid-vaccination or by phoning 119.

Please do not contact us to get an appointment. Information on the vaccine is available on the NHS.UK website. 

 

Update 8th April

Click on link below to view communication regarding MHRA and JCVI announcement regarding Oxford/AstraZeneca Vaccine and next steps

PHE_COVID-19_AZ_vaccination_guide

 

UPDATE 7th April

COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca and thromboembolic events with concurrent low platelet counts

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and the Government’s independent expert advisory body,  the Commission on Human Medicines (CHM), is conducting a thorough review of reports of extremely rare thromboembolic events including cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) occurring in conjunction with thrombocytopaenia following the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine. This notification informs you of the current status of the review and treatment guidance and provides information on how to report suspected cases.

By 31st March 2021, MHRA had received Yellow Card reports of 79 cases of thromboembolic events with concurrent thrombocytopaenia following vaccination with COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca, 44 cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) with thrombocytopaenia and 35 cases of other major thrombotic events, including one arterial, with thrombocytopaenia.  These cases occurred in 51 women and 28 men, aged from 18 to 79 years.  The estimated number of doses of vaccine administered in the UK by 31st March was 20.2 million giving an overall case incidence of 4.4 per million doses.

All reports are being followed up for clinical details and 19 cases have had a fatal outcome. Some cases have positive platelet factor 4 (PF4) antibodies and elevated D-dimer. In reports where this information was provided, all cases occurred after a first dose of the vaccine. 

The CHM has carefully considered all available data, noting the need for further clinical details on the case reports and that data are also lacking on the background rate of CVST, including during the pandemic because Covid infection has been associated with thrombotic events.  The CHM has advised that the currently available evidence does not establish a causal association between the AstraZeneca COVID-19 Vaccine and these events, but investigations (epidemiological and mechanistic) need to continue. The CHM’s advice remains that the overall benefits of the vaccines against COVID-19 continue to outweigh any risks in the vast majority of people, and that the evidence does not currently support excluding any age group from vaccination.  In view of the available data, COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca is contraindicated in patients with a history of major venous and arterial thrombosis with thrombocytopenia.  COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca should only be given to patients with a history of CVST, acquired or hereditary thrombophilia, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, or antiphospholipid syndrome when the benefits outweigh any potential risks.

Because these events are extremely rare and a comparatively small number of second doses have been given, it is currently not known how frequently these events may occur following a second dose of the vaccine.  As a precaution, anyone who experienced cerebral or other major blood clots occurring with low levels of platelets after their first vaccine dose of COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca should not have their second dose. 

Anyone who did not have these side effects should come forward for their second dose when invited.

COVID-19 vaccine advice in pregnancy remains that pregnant women should discuss with their healthcare professional whether the benefits of having the vaccine outweigh the risks for them, noting the extremely rare risk of thromboembolic events with concurrent thrombocytopaenia referred to above.

The MHRA recently confirmed that the evidence to date does not suggest that the COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca causes venous thromboembolism without a low platelet count.

Treatment guidance

Further information is available from the British Society for Haematology guidance issued on thrombosis and thrombocytopaenia possibly occurring after vaccination with COVID-19 vaccines. This includes information on presentation and typical laboratory features, and treatment recommendations. The guidance also includes advice on recommended investigations for possible cases.

Advice for the public

While the MHRA continues to investigate these cases, as a precautionary measure anyone that develops symptoms after vaccination is advised to seek prompt medical advice, such as:

  • shortness of breath, chest or persistent abdominal pain, leg swelling
    • blurred vision, confusion or seizures
    • unexplained pin-prick rash or bruising beyond the injection site

Furthermore anybody with new onset of severe or persistent headache that does not respond to simple painkillers starting four days or more after vaccination should speak to their doctor.

UPDATE 22nd March

We have now filled the last of our appointments for 1st vaccinations.

We apologise to anybody who has received a text this afternoon and been told there are no appointments left – there appears to be messages that are delayed in the system.

Thank you to everybody who has supported the vaccination programme with the surgery, we will contact those needing their 2nd vaccine as soon as we have appointments available.

Anybody who has received an invitation for a 1st vaccine, please call 119 or www.nhs.uk/covidvaccination 

UPDATE 15th March

Safety of Oxford/AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine

The World Health Organisation and European Medicines Agency both say there is no indication of a link between the vaccine and reports of blood clots.

In a statement, Dr Phil Bryan, MHRA Vaccines Safety Lead, said: “Vaccine safety is of paramount importance and we continually monitor the safety of vaccines to ensure that the benefits outweigh any potential risks. It has not been confirmed that the report of a blood clot, in Denmark, was caused by the COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca. The Danish, Norwegian and Icelandic authorities’ action to temporarily suspend use of the vaccine is precautionary whilst they investigate. Blood clots can occur naturally and are not uncommon.

“More than 11 million doses of the COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca vaccine have now been administered across the UK. Reports of blood clots received so far are not greater than the number that would have occurred naturally in the vaccinated population. The safety of the public will always come first. We are keeping this issue under close review but available evidence does not confirm that the vaccine is the cause. People should still go and get their COVID-19 vaccine when asked to do so.”

A further statement from AstraZeneca provides additional detail including: “A careful review of all available safety data of more than 17 million people vaccinated in the European Union (EU) and UK with COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca has shown no evidence of an increased risk of pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or thrombocytopenia, in any defined age group, gender, batch or in any particular country.

“So far across the EU and UK, there have been 15 events of DVT and 22 events of pulmonary embolism reported among those given the vaccine, based on the number of cases the company has received as of 8 March. This is much lower than would be expected to occur naturally in a general population of this size and is similar across other licensed COVID-19 vaccines.”

UPDATE 8TH MARCH

Covid-19 Vaccination Update

On behalf of the Practice Partners, I write to advise that we will be contacting patients over the next few weeks to arrange their second Covid-19 vaccination.  You do not need to contact the surgery, as we will contact you.

We are also expecting a limited supply of vaccines to provide a first dose for eligible patients, again we will contact you when supplies become available.  If you are eligible and do not wish to wait for the Practice to contact you, please visit – http://nhs.uk/covidvaccination or ring 119.  When booking your vaccine this will be provided at one of the mass vaccination sites / locations in the area. 

We will publish updated information regarding our vaccination programme on our website and Facebook page when it becomes available

Please note that the surgery will not be providing vaccinations for the Government groups 7-9, as this will be undertaken at one of the mass vaccination sites / locations.

Dr Fiona Durnian

GP Partner

UPDATE 23rd February

The government has recently extended the cohort of people who are identified as extremely clinically vulnerable from Covid and are now required to shield. You may have recently received a letter informing you of this.   It has come to our attention some patients have been identified incorrectly.  We are reviewing the medical records of newly identified patients to check if the advice to shield is correct.

Should we find that you have been identified incorrectly we will contact you to advise of this change in status on your medical record.

In the interim, please continue to follow the advice on the Government letter you have received.

Frontline health and social care workers
If you are a frontline health and social care worker and have not yet been offered or received your first vaccine please contact us via this email address cheshireccg.covid19staffresponses@nhs.net and we will respond to your request as a priority. 

The go-to resource for up-to-date advice on the vaccination programme

Tuesday 9th February

Call for people aged 70 and over to contact NHS for a COVID-19 jab

People aged 70 and over who have not yet been vaccinated against Covid and who would like to be are today being asked to contact the NHS to arrange a jab.

Until now the NHS has asked people to wait until they are contacted to help ensure that those who are most vulnerable are protected first – and that remains the case for most people.

However, to ensure absolutely everyone is offered the vaccine, people aged 70 and over can now contact the NHS so they can be vaccinated by the middle of this month.

You can contact the surgery to book in for a vaccine or arrange a vaccination is through the national booking
service: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/coronavirus-vaccination/

Anyone unable to book online can call 119 free of charge, anytime between 7amand 11pm seven days a week. If a suitable and convenient slot is not available people can also call their GP practice. 

Many who have not yet booked an appointment are already receiving follow up letters and phone calls this week to encourage them to take up the offer of a jab.

GP teams have also been asked to contact their clinically extremely vulnerable patients, who have been asked to shield, to ensure they have been offered the vaccine.

Anyone who received a letter in 2021 asking them to shield, should also receive an invitation from us as well as an invitation from the national booking service inviting them for a jab.

People in priority groups who are given a vaccination appointment by both their local GP team and the National Booking Service should cancel the one they do not want so the slot can be used by someone else.

Health and social care workers, who are also among the top four priority groups for vaccination, should speak to their employer about arranging their jab.

 Thursday 4th February

As part of Northwich PCN we are now successfully vaccinating group 4, patients over 70 and clinically extremely vulnerable. We have had clinics running all week, the next clinic for Danebridge patients is on Sunday.

UPDATE Tuesday 26th January

Winsford Morrison’s covid vaccination site will be going live on Thursday this week (28th January 2021) and will have a weekly capacity of 5000 vaccinations. 

Patients will be sent a letter by NHS England and given a unique reference number to use on the website or by phone. They are then offered a range of sites to access and timeslots from which they choose. The booking system also books a 2nd vaccination at the same site 12 weeks later to ensure both are booked in.

 You can either book to go to Winsford, or wait to be invited by us to attend the Kingsmead Clinic

UPDATE Monday 25th January

Lots of people are contacting us to enquire about their covid vaccination.  We understand that this is important and we are working as hard as we can to facilitate this monumental vaccination programme.

Danebridge’s next vaccination clinic is the 1st and 2nd of February and we will be contacting patients aged 75years
and older  directly to invite them for this.

We will be expecting another delivery of vaccines shortly and will be able to update you further when we know more information about this.

Please do not ring the surgery to make enquiries about when your vaccination will be, this is only blocking the phone lines for patients ringing with urgent medical problems.

Thank you for your patience, support and understanding.

UPDATE THURSDAY 21st January 

Our covid vaccination clinics are still runnning today and tomorrow, despite the floods and snow

UPDATE TUESDAY 12th January –

On Monday, January 11th 2021, the Etihad Tennis Club in Manchester also became one of the country’s first large-scale, regional vaccination sites.

Nationally, letters are being sent out to more than 600,000 people aged 80 and over who live up to a 45 minute drive from one of the new centres, inviting them to book an appointment.

The centres are an additional option for people, who can book an appointment at one of the seven centres through a national booking service either online or over the phone. If it is not convenient for them, they can instead be jabbed at one of their local vaccination centres in the coming weeks.

We would advise that patients should wait to be contacted by the practice but you do have the option to book online elsewhere if you don’t wish to wait.

Cheshire’s COVID-19 Vaccination – what you need to know      

UPDATE 4th January –

We are very pleased to announce that we will be starting to invite patients for the covid vaccination this week at Kingsmead Clinic. Our vaccinations will commence On Friday 8th January. If you are not contacted in the first batch please do not worry – we will be vaccinating the oldest members of our community first. You do not need to contact the surgery to book the appointment, you will be contacted by a member of our team.

The Northwich Primary Care Network (PCN) Vaccination Centre is Kingsmead Surgery, here are  some things you need to be aware of:

  • Motorised scooters/wheelchairs are not permissible  at the site
  • We are vaccinating the most vulnerable first
  • We will contact you to make an appointment for your first dose of the COVID -19 Vaccination.
  • Parking at the site is limited, you will be able to use the Kingsmead Square car park or park on the road at the side of the surgery, please be mindful that the road at the rear of the surgery is an access road to the local primary school.
  • Please cancel your appointment if you have:
    • been tested COVID positive in the last 28 days
    • had any vaccine within 7 days
    • Have a temperature or started with a new persistent cough
    • Recently returned from overseas
  • Only arrive 5 minutes before your appointment time
  • If you need to be accompanied to attend your appointment please ensure you are only accompanied by one carer
  • You are recommended  to wait on site for 15 minutes after your appointment
  • Make sure you have a warm coat on as its going to be cold, but try to wear something underneath so we can have good access to your arm.

Thank you for following this advice

Please help us to deliver the COVID-19 vaccination programme safely and effectively by following this simple guidance:

1. We will contact you when is the right time for you to come forward. Please do not contact the NHS to seek a vaccine before then.

2. When you are invited for a vaccine, please act on your invite and make sure you attend appointments when you arrange them.

3. Please continue to wear a face covering and follow social distancing and hand hygiene guidance as, until a vaccine has been fully rolled out, this is the most effective way to reduce transmission of the virus and help save lives

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Sandiway Engagement sessions

Dear Patient

As you know we have limited space for the engagement sessions and due to the engagement sessions being postponed until April we will provide the opportunity for people to feedback through a survey for completion by our patients who are interested in the engagement sessions but may not be able to attend.  The survey asks the same questions as will be discussed on the day of the engagement session to allow us to gather all the feedback collectively.

The survey can be found by clicking here

Session Number

Date

 

TopicPanelQuestionsSession feedback
11st April at 1 pm – CompletedIssues around medications and repeat prescriptionsDr Perry, Clare Davies clinical pharmacist, Mandy Skelding-Jones

·  What have we learnt?

·  What do you think are alternative ways of getting prescriptions?

·  Open questions to panel

 Session one (medicines)- feedback document
28th April at 1 pm

Dropping off of samples

Dr Perry, Mandy Skelding-Jones

· What have we learnt?

·  What do you think are alternative ways of dropping off samples?

·  Open questions to panel

Session two (samples) – feedback document
315th April at 1pm

Appointment Booking (specifically for Sandiway and Cuddington residents)

Dr Perry, Mandy Skelding-Jones, Gilly Davis (Patient Services Manager)

· What have we learnt?

·  How do you think the appointment service can be improved?

·  Open questions to panel

Session three (appointments) – feedback document
422nd  April at 1pm

Alternative model of care

Dr Mullin, Mandy Skelding-Jones, Cheshire West Integrated Care Partnership representative Session four (new models of care) feedback document final
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Practice Closures for May Bank Holidays

Please be aware that GP Practices will be closed for the May Bank Holiday on Monday 3rd May and the Spring Bank Holiday on Monday 31st May.

If you need medical advice during this period you can:

Visit your pharmacy – Your local pharmacy can provide confidential, expert advice and treatment for a range of common illnesses and complaints. Visit nhs.uk to find a pharmacy open near you.

Use NHS 111 – If you need urgent medical advice but your condition is not life threatening. NHS 111 is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and you can access either online or by calling 111 from your landline or mobile (all calls are free).

Dial 999 – for a genuine medical emergency including; loss of consciousness, acute confused state and fits that are not stopping, persistent and/or severe chest pain, breathing difficulties, severe bleeding that cannot be stopped dial 999.

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Oxford/AstraZeneca Vaccine: Reports of very rare blood clots

The MHRA is carrying out a detailed review of reports of a very rare blood clotting problem affecting a small number of people who have had the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.

The problem can also happen in people who have not been vaccinated and it’s not yet clear why it affects some people.

The COVID-19 vaccine can help stop you getting seriously ill or dying from coronavirus. For people aged 30 or over and those with other health conditions, the benefits of being vaccinated outweigh any risk of clotting problems.

For people under 30 without other health conditions, it’s currently advised that it’s preferable to have another COVID-19 vaccine instead of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.

Call 111 immediately if you get any of these symptoms starting from around 4 days to 4 weeks after being vaccinated:

  • a severe headache that is not relieved with painkillers or is getting worse
  • a headache that feels worse when you lie down or bend over
  • a headache that’s unusual for you and occurs with blurred vision, feeling or being sick, problems speaking, weakness, drowsiness or seizures (fits)
  • a rash that looks like small bruises or bleeding under the skin
  • shortness of breath, chest pain, leg swelling or persistent abdominal (tummy) pain

Find out more about COVID-19 vaccination and blood clotting on GOV.UK

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Think NHS 111 First

If you need medical help but it’s not a life-threatening emergency, call 111. Depending on your needs your advisor will either book you a time slot at your Emergency Department or at the best local service for you. This will help keep you safe and maintain social distancing.

NHS 111 First Poster

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CCG website regarding recent Covid-19 AZ vaccine concerns

Reports of very rare blood clots

08 April 2021

The MHRA is carrying out a detailed review of reports of a very rare blood clotting problem affecting a small number of people who have had the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.

Click to read the latest update on our CCG website – https://www.cheshireccg.nhs.uk/news/news-stories/reports-of-very-rare-blood-clots/

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COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca

Update 8th April

Click on link below to view communication regarding MHRA and JCVI announcement regarding Oxford/AstraZeneca Vaccine and next steps

PHE_COVID-19_AZ_vaccination_guide

COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca and thromboembolic events with concurrent low platelet counts

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and the Government’s independent expert advisory body,  the Commission on Human Medicines (CHM), is conducting a thorough review of reports of extremely rare thromboembolic events including cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) occurring in conjunction with thrombocytopaenia following the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine. This notification informs you of the current status of the review and treatment guidance and provides information on how to report suspected cases.

By 31st March 2021, MHRA had received Yellow Card reports of 79 cases of thromboembolic events with concurrent thrombocytopaenia following vaccination with COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca, 44 cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) with thrombocytopaenia and 35 cases of other major thrombotic events, including one arterial, with thrombocytopaenia.  These cases occurred in 51 women and 28 men, aged from 18 to 79 years.  The estimated number of doses of vaccine administered in the UK by 31st March was 20.2 million giving an overall case incidence of 4.4 per million doses.

All reports are being followed up for clinical details and 19 cases have had a fatal outcome. Some cases have positive platelet factor 4 (PF4) antibodies and elevated D-dimer. In reports where this information was provided, all cases occurred after a first dose of the vaccine.

The CHM has carefully considered all available data, noting the need for further clinical details on the case reports and that data are also lacking on the background rate of CVST, including during the pandemic because Covid infection has been associated with thrombotic events.  The CHM has advised that the currently available evidence does not establish a causal association between the AstraZeneca COVID-19 Vaccine and these events, but investigations (epidemiological and mechanistic) need to continue. The CHM’s advice remains that the overall benefits of the vaccines against COVID-19 continue to outweigh any risks in the vast majority of people, and that the evidence does not currently support excluding any age group from vaccination.  In view of the available data, COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca is contraindicated in patients with a history of major venous and arterial thrombosis with thrombocytopenia.  COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca should only be given to patients with a history of CVST, acquired or hereditary thrombophilia, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, or antiphospholipid syndrome when the benefits outweigh any potential risks.

Because these events are extremely rare and a comparatively small number of second doses have been given, it is currently not known how frequently these events may occur following a second dose of the vaccine.  As a precaution, anyone who experienced cerebral or other major blood clots occurring with low levels of platelets after their first vaccine dose of COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca should not have their second dose.

Anyone who did not have these side effects should come forward for their second dose when invited.

COVID-19 vaccine advice in pregnancy remains that pregnant women should discuss with their healthcare professional whether the benefits of having the vaccine outweigh the risks for them, noting the extremely rare risk of thromboembolic events with concurrent thrombocytopaenia referred to above.

The MHRA recently confirmed that the evidence to date does not suggest that the COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca causes venous thromboembolism without a low platelet count.

Treatment guidance

Further information is available from the British Society for Haematology guidance issued on thrombosis and thrombocytopaenia possibly occurring after vaccination with COVID-19 vaccines. This includes information on presentation and typical laboratory features, and treatment recommendations. The guidance also includes advice on recommended investigations for possible cases.

Advice for the public

While the MHRA continues to investigate these cases, as a precautionary measure anyone that develops symptoms after vaccination is advised to seek prompt medical advice, such as:

  • shortness of breath, chest or persistent abdominal pain, leg swelling
    • blurred vision, confusion or seizures
    • unexplained pin-prick rash or bruising beyond the injection site

Furthermore anybody with new onset of severe or persistent headache that does not respond to simple painkillers starting four days or more after vaccination should speak to their doctor.

By

Bowel Cancer: Do you know the signs and Symptoms to look out for?

April is Bowel Cancer Awareness Month. Bowel Cancer is the second biggest UK’s killer cancer but that doesn’t need to be the case as it is treatable and curable, especially when diagnosed at an early stage.

Symptoms can include:

  • Bleeding from your bottom and/or blood in your poo

There are several possible causes of bleeding from your bottom or blood in your bowel movements (poo). Bright red blood may come from swollen blood vessels (haemorrhoids or piles) in your back passage. It may also be caused by bowel cancer. Dark red or black blood may come from your bowel or stomach. Tell your doctor about any bleeding so they can find out what is causing it.

  • A persistent and unexplained change in bowel habit

Tell your GP if you have noticed any persistent and unexplained changes in your bowel habit, especially if you also have bleeding from your back passage. You may have looser poo and you may need to poo more often than normal. Or you may feel as though you’re not going to the toilet often enough or you might not feel as though you’re not fully emptying your bowels.

  • Unexplained weight loss

This is less common than some of the other symptoms. Speak to your GP if you have lost weight and you don’t know why. You may not feel like eating if you feel sick, bloated or if you just don’t feel hungry.

  • Extreme tiredness for no obvious reason

Bowel cancer may lead to a lack of iron in the body, which can cause anaemia (lack of red blood cells). If you have anaemia, you are likely to feel very tired and your skin may look pale.

  • A pain or lump in your tummy

You may have pain or a lump in your stomach area (abdomen) or back passage. See your GP if these symptoms don’t go away or if they’re affecting how you sleep or eat.

Most people with these symptoms don’t have bowel cancer, there are many other health problems that can cause similar symptoms such as piles, constipation, anal fissures or IBS.

If you have any symptoms, don’t be embarrassed and don’t ignore them – book an appointment with your GP.

For more information and advice visit Bowel Cancer UK

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Practice Closures for Easter Bank Holiday

Please be aware that GP Practices close for the Easter Bank Holidays which are on Friday 2nd April (Good Friday) and Monday 5th April (Bank Holiday Monday).

If you need medical advice during this period you can:

Visit your pharmacy – Your local pharmacy can provide confidential, expert advice and treatment for a range of common illnesses and complaints. Visit nhs.uk to find a pharmacy open near you.

Use NHS 111 – If you need urgent medical advice but your condition is not life threatening. NHS 111 is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and you can access either online or by calling 111 from your landline or mobile (all calls are free).

Dial 999 – for a genuine medical emergency including; loss of consciousness, acute confused state and fits that are not stopping, persistent and/or severe chest pain, breathing difficulties, severe bleeding that cannot be stopped dial 999.